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SCOPE – Center for Excellence in Medical Education

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Centre

The vision of the centre is to foster lifelong learning for improved public health and patient care. The aim is to develop educational models to strengthen students’ awareness of how practices can be reshaped by research and give students confidence and capacities needed to challenge established practices. In short, the centre will enable the students to initiate change. The strategy of the centre is to facilitate student involvement and learning in how to ensure that clinical practice is continually updated, based on new knowledge. The centre will focus especially on skills in receiving and giving supervision and assessment methods mirroring real life situations.


Strengths and weaknesses

The site visit confirmed that the existing academic, educational and managerial competence is overall committed to excellence and the centre plan.

The student engagement and activity is of extraordinary high quality. The students are happy with the way the faculty respond to their suggestions. They were involved in the bid writing and conceptualisation.
The stakeholders are somewhat disengaged. They were not involved in the bid writing; some of them had not even seen or read the bid. However, they all emphasized the need for interdisciplinary, interprofessional education.

The teachers demonstrated no sense of collective ownership. They were not involved in the bid writing; some of them had just read the bid before the meeting. They had fragmented and differing ideas of what SCOPE is about. Most of them are very enthusiastic about their own ideas of interdisciplinary, interprofessional teaching. They all expected that SCOPE would give them more resources.

The managers and leaders have a lack of consistency as to where interdisciplinarity or interprofessionality fits in. The leader of the centre could not answer questions in a convincing matter with respect to measuring progress (e.g. surveys, assessments, exams). The question “what is the innovation” of SCOPE was not answered at all. The leaders stated that internal and external dissemination is still a challenge. The answers on evaluation and impact were very weak and there was no understanding of methodological approaches.

Overall, the focus and objectives of SCOPE remained unclear. There was a lack of understanding of the project amongst many people. The likelihood of success seems to be very low and a stronger, more focussed and thoughtful collective leadership with an ongoing stakeholder engagement is needed. Dissemination, evaluation and impact have not been sufficiently worked out. There was confusion about whether the application comes from the Faculty of Medicine and includes only medical students or from both the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences including students from both Faculties, soon merging.

These items need addressing through further reflection and planning in order to produce a proposal that NOKUT could confidently expect to succeed.

Concept:

The vision of SCOPE is to foster lifelong learning for improved public health and patient care. SCOPE wants to facilitate student involvement and learning in how to ensure that clinical practice is continuously updated, based on new knowledge. SCOPE will focus especially on skills in receiving and giving supervision and assessment methods mirroring real life situations. The result sought is practitioners that are even better at regenerating their skills, who are highly motivated and able to update their knowledge to cope with widely varying work situations.


Strengths and weaknesses:

The bid from SCOPE builds on solid documentation of quality in existing provision. This includes clear indication of managerial support and capability, and a systematic pedagogical model based on a mature approach to problem-based learning. There are very good student outcomes.

The challenge of how to deliver high performing interdisciplinary teams is a key concern internationally.  Student co-creation and engagement is therefore a commendable feature in this bid. Student-led clinics and including students in research groups are examples of clever ways to get students involved. Both are means by which students are developing ‘real life’ professional skills. There are close links proposed with the educational development unit, which is an asset.

The overall educational vision is powerful and exciting. The bid includes clear thinking around evaluation and impact with the preferred theoretical model identified.

It would have been useful to give a clearer sense of the specific changes that students will experience, for instance how pedagogy will change to achieve the desired outcomes. In general, the steps to be taken could have been specified to a greater extent.


Points to consider:

  • What are the key steps to be taken to achieve the centre goals?
  • How will students initiate change?
  • How can greater emphasis be placed on the students’ own research?
  • What training and subsequent feedback will be offered to students on their team facilitation skills to ensure they continue to develop their professional skills?

Grade: 6
Site visit: Yes

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